22nd Regiment Basic Combat Training

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22nd Regiment Basic Combat Training

Post by Lance Corporal Aftershock on Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:35 am


Hello 22nd.

As of now, all of the ArmA 2 players will have to do a Basic Combat Training in order to participate in Operations. If you do not pass this training, you will ofcourse still be able to play on the server and attend operation trainings. However, you will not be allowed to attend the actual operation.

I've made a little list of things that will be tested in the training course. You do not need to learn this scheme, everything will be explained on the training itself. It is ofcourse always useful to take a look.













Basic Training
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* Obstacle course - Do an obstacle course under a certain amount of seconds.

* Basic formations - Line formation, V-formation and (staggered) Column formation.

* Target practice - Hit a certain amount of targets within a certain amount of time.

* Medic course - Learn how to deal with wounded players and get into defensive positions.

* Radio course - Learn how to operate close range radios (long range radios for pilots).

* Explosive course - Learn how to use rocket launchers, throw grenades and set satchel charges.

* Situation course - Learn how to deal with certain basic situations such as getting out of a vehicle,
            learning aircraft awareness smokes.

* Vehicle course - Learn how to properly drive (in a convoy), fast-rope out of helicopters and breach & clear afterwards, when to hold and open fire and what to do when the convoy takes fire.


Pilot Training
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* Manoeuvring - Show the Drill Sergeant that you are actually capable of flying an aircraft. Lift off, make bends, etc.

* Landing - Learn how to go in for a landing and actually land different aircraft.

* Shooting course - Take out certain targets and learn how to use countermeasures against enemies.

* Radio course - Learn how to operate a long range radio.

* Fast-roping - Learn how to use fast-ropes and keeping the helicopter stationary.



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>During BCT you do not speak unless given permission to do so. The PTS system will be
   active during training. Do NOT interrupt a Drill Sergeant or Supervisor!!!
>If you do not pass BCT, you have the right to retry at the next BCT.
>You are NOT allowed to attend in operations if you do not pass BCT. However, you are
   allowed to attend operation trainings without passing BCT.
>If you pass BCT you are supposed to use your experience in operations and not make
  dumb mistakes anymore. Superiors have the right to demote you.
>You are allowed to fly aircraft in operations ONLY if you have passed pilot training.
>You need the ACE & ACRE mods.



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>Click here to see the Combat Training Grade Criteria and Listings<


Last edited by Lance Corporal Aftershock on Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:01 am; edited 6 times in total
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Re: 22nd Regiment Basic Combat Training

Post by Colonel Scoutie on Mon Mar 18, 2013 10:49 am

FORMATION BRIEF

Listen up ladies, I have some formations to show you all

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WEDGE FORMATION

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The wedge formation is a very versatile one that is easy to establish and control. It allows for good all-around observation and security, and can be used in the majority of situations encountered. Fire can be placed in any direction in good quantity, and a shift in formation upon contact is easy to accomplish to suit where the contact came from.



If used at the squad level, the squad leader typically trails behind the leading fireteam, putting himself in the middle of the formation where he can best control things. When used at the fireteam level, the fireteam leader is the tip of the wedge, and the fireteam members guide off of his movements.

The wedge formation is the one most naturally assumed during gameplay, and is also the preferred formation to use when assaulting the enemy.

When not otherwise stated, the default formation for fireteams and squads is the wedge formation.



"Keeping proper interval while moving as a fireteam in wedge formation"

Note that when transitioning a wedge into a line, the 2nd and 3rd elements simply move forward onto the left and right of the leading element, respectively.

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LINE FORMATION

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This should be easy for all you hardcore Napoleonic guys,

The line formation is well-suited for advancing towards a known or suspected threat with the maximum number of guns brought to bear, and excels at placing a heavy volume of fire to the formation's front.




"A fireteam advancing on-line"

The line formation offers great overlapping fields of observation and heavy fire to the front. It is relatively easy to control, but suffers from being vulnerable to flanking fire. It also does not offer great flank or rear security, and should be employed with that in mind.

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COLUMN FORMATION

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This is more or less the final vital formation, a few more will be understood after basic training,

The column formation is the simplest formation to establish, as it is merely a matter of follow-the-leader. It allows for very rapid movement because of this.

This formation is best used during travel when contact is not imminently expected or speed is a high priority.



A column formation has great firepower to the flanks, but is not geared towards contact from the front (which it is vulnerable to). A column can rapidly shift upon contact to a line or other formation where appropriate, giving it good flexibility.

Column formations can be used when traveling through an area where it is not practical to spread out into a line, wedge, or other formation. For instance, travel through a restricted valley might require a column.

It is important to note that "column" formations should not consist of one-after-the-other perfectly-lined-up troops. Staggering the column so that nobody is directly in line of each other helps to reduce the vulnerability that the formation would otherwise have from the front and rear.

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Crossing of Danger Areas

Post by Colonel Scoutie on Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:07 pm

CROSSING OF DANGER AREAS

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A big problem that can be faced and I have found a lack of knowledge in,
I don't want to seem like your mummy holding your hand as you cross the road, but when you have machineguns firing at you i fear for your safety, bullets are much faster than cars and can cause quite a severe boo-boo.


"Rushing across a street with coverage"

Danger areas are locations at which there's a heightened level of vulnerability for anyone caught within them, and must be treated with due caution. They can be bridges, streams, large open lanes in forested terrain, or even streets in an urban environment. Danger areas are frequently observed by the enemy, and can have snipers, machinegunners, or enemy rifle fireteams ready to deliver fire into them on short notice.

The technique for crossing a danger area is another form of bounding overwatch. The idea is to maintain security and cross in small numbers that will not draw undue attention or fire.

Once you have determined that you are facing a "danger area" and must treat it as such, there are four basic steps to follow.
Set up 2/3rds of your force as a security element. Ensure that they are spread out sufficiently that they do not stick out to observation. They will be concerned with watching the flanks and rear as well as observing and covering the scout element when it crosses.
Send a scout element (typically fireteam-sized) across first while the other elements cover them. The scouts will do a limited penetration of the far side of the danger area, check for enemy forces, and then act as security for the rest of the group when they cross.
Once the scouts have given the all-clear, begin crossing remaining elements one at a time.
Once everyone is across, consolidate and continue on with the mission.



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Re: 22nd Regiment Basic Combat Training

Post by Colonel Scoutie on Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:09 pm

MOUT ENVIRONMENT

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MOUT/CQB combat is easily the most dangerous environment for infantry to operate. Threats can come from above, or appear and disappear in an instant in the urban clutter. The fighting is fast, violent, and confusing. Good communication is needed at all levels to provide timely information as well as avoid friendly fire incidents. MOUT combat at the platoon level must be done at a deliberate, methodical pace, and all elements need to be able to move in a cohesive manner that prevents anyone from getting cut off or lost, and maintains a very high level of situational awareness and defensive cohesion.

There are several tips for the infantrymen operating in these environments.
Stay aware of the vertical element in a MOUT environment. Enemies can be on the rooftops, and it requires sharp observation from all players to spot them before they can do harm.
Know your sector of observation/cover and be diligent in watching/covering it. One person letting their guard down for a few seconds can doom many.



"Maintaining 360 security before clearing a building"

Pie off all danger areas. Pieing is simply the process of moving carefully and deliberately in a fashion that allows you to see as much of an area as possible before entering it. This has a multitude of uses in all areas of combat, but becomes particularly important in MOUT/CQB with buildings and streets. Pieing a room allows for you to visually clear everything except for a corner or two, which allows you to enter and immediately focus on the danger areas (ie uncleared corners) without having to do a full sweep of the rest of the room at the same time.



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INFANTRY LEADER TIPS FOR MOUT

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Move with deliberation. In the MOUT fight, haphazard movement, excessively fast speeds, and overextending units easily results in casualties.
Smoke is extremely effective in MOUT - use it! Know how to employ smoke properly, and use it to maximum effect whenever possible. One well-placed smoke grenade can mask an entire street or one side of a building and save lives through screening friendlies or masking the enemy.
Machineguns, emplaced properly, can cut an entire street (or more) off from enemy maneuver. Emplacing your machinegun assets properly can be a huge factor in winning an urban fight.
Know how to split up as a fireteam into covering and clearing teams and clear a structure. These two enter the structure, with one peeling to the left, and the other to the right. They secure each room and move methodically throughout the structure until it is cleared, at which point they exit the structure, join up with their other two fireteam members, and continue on.
Do not commit more than a fireteam to the interior of a structure up to medium size. Very large buildings should have two fireteams at most, with the third acting as a covering team. Cramming too many people into a building, especially with the way ArmA2 handles explosive damage, is asking for a catastrophe.

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Re: 22nd Regiment Basic Combat Training

Post by Colonel Scoutie on Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:14 pm

ENTRY AND STACK METHODS

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When it comes to making entry into a room, the members of the clearing team have two options.

Hook - In this, the player moves into the doorway and then immediately hooks to the side that he had been 'stacked up' on. For instance - if the player is on the right side of the doorway, he will enter through the doorway and immediately turn right.

Cross - In this, the player moves through the doorway and continues opposite of the direction he had been 'stacked up'. For instance - if the player is on the right side of the doorway, he will move through the doorway and cross to the left side once inside the room.

There are two ways that a 2-man stack can 'stack up' on a door - one is with both members on the same side of the doorway ("stack"). If this is the case, the first man will state his entry type ("Cross!" or "Hook!"), and the second man will do the opposite, to ensure proper coverage of the room. This type of stack is best used when an open door is present. If the entry type is not stated, the second man simply does the opposite of what the entry man does.

When ordering a stack, the lead man will either say "stack left" or "stack right" - the directions are relative to facing the doorway. "Stack left" will result in the entry team being on the left side of the door.



"2-man right-side stack"

The other option is to have one player on either side of the doorway ("split stack"). The senior player will state his entry type, and the other player will prepare to do the same type of entry, except from the opposite side of the door. This type of stack is best assumed when a closed door is present - movement across an open doorway for the sake of setting up a 'split stack' should never be done.



"2-man split stack"

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ROOM CLEARING PROCEDURES

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When the stack is set, the next step is to actually carry out an entry from start to finish. For this, the following steps act as a guideline for how a typical room takedown occurs.
Ensure your weapon is on full-automatic and that you have a fresh magazine inserted.
Frag or bang the room (optional). Frag grenades are difficult to throw accurately in ArmA2, so you may want to avoid "fragging" rooms until you've become quite familiar with how to use them in the urban environment. introduces a number of different throw styles that can be used to tailor a throw to the situation at hand, as well as "flashbangs" that can be used to stun or blind any enemies inside of a room, with less chance of catastrophic death to friendlies in the event of a bad throw. If a frag or bang has been thrown, the players wait for it to detonate before entering.
Each player enters in sequence, engaging targets to their front as they move through and out of the 'fatal funnel' that is the doorway.
After moving through the doorway, each player continues in the direction prescribed by their entry type (hook or cross), clearing from his front to the corner he is moving towards. Players must continue to move into their 'corner' regardless of the amount of enemy fire received - continuing to push to their corner will draw fire towards them, allowing the following members of the stack to successfully enter the room and begin engaging the enemy.
After clearing his 'near' corner, he continues moving towards it while pivoting to clear the wall that runs to his 'far' corner.
After clearing the far corner, he clears to the center of the room, then clears to the other side of the room, stopping short of where his teammate is.
Once the room is deemed clear, each player uses direct-speaking or group VON to announce "Clear!" to his teammate.
The entire process, from start to finish, happens in a few seconds at most.


Since ArmA2 is ultimately not a CQB sim, that's about as far as we'll go into CQB tactics. Knowing how to enter rooms properly should prepare you for the most common CQB situations you'll encounter in the game.

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Re: 22nd Regiment Basic Combat Training

Post by Colonel Scoutie on Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:51 pm

RADIO BRIEF

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RADIO SLANG

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Negative "No"
Affirmative "Yes"
Oscar Mike "On the Move"
Delta Hotel "Direct Hit"
Lima Charlie "Loud and Clear"
Mike "Minute"
Sierra Hotel "Going in Hot"
Tango Mike "Thank you much"
Tango Uniform "Shut up"
Tango Down/ Scratch One "Enemy Down"
Charlie Foxtrot "Cluster F***"
Wilco "Will Cooperate"
Roger/Copy "I understand"
Over "Finished a sentence waiting for reply"
Out "Conversation over"

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NATO PHONETIC ALPHABET

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A - Alpha
B - Bravo
C - Charlie
D - Delta
E - Echo
F - Foxtrot
G - Golf
H - Hotel
I - India
J - Juliet
K - Kilo
L - Lima
M - Mike
N - November
O - Oscar
P - Papa
Q - Quebec
R - Romeo
S - Sierra
T - Tango
U - Uniform
V - Victor
W - Whiskey
X - X-ray
Y - Yankee
Z - Zulu

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ACRE RADIO CONTROLS

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Left Shift + Left Control + X = Access Current Radio
Left Shift + Left Control + A or S = Switch between ACRE Radios
Left Shift + Left Alt. + Q = ACRE Interaction Menu: Access Radio Rack in Vehicle (ALL air/land vehicles have an AN/PRC-117 radio in them, also used (in ACE for sure) to access Command Radio on squadmate)
Left Shift + Left Alt. + E = ACRE Self Interaction Menu: Access Radio Functions
Left Shift + Left Control + (Up Arrow, Left Arrow, or Right Arrow) = Set which ear current radio receives transmissions through.
Left Shift + Left Control + 1 = PTT Preset: Talk on 343
Left Shift + Left Control + 2 = PTT Preset: Talk on (Command Radio)
To set maximum range, click the #8 (PGM) button and then click ENT (Enter). You will see the five settings modes, the first one blinking:
FREQ CS DATA
SQL POWER NAME
Click the Left or Right arrow buttons until POWER is blinking, then click the ENT (Enter) button. Now you will see a familiar display:
CUR: 5000
NEW: 5000
Click the left or right arrow buttons to adjust NEW to max range (20,000), then press ENT (Enter).

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Re: 22nd Regiment Basic Combat Training

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